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An Artist’s Stitches Represent 5.4M Women An...

An Artist’s Stitches Represent 5.4M Women And Challenge The Texas Abortion Laws

On March 2nd, a massive quilt with 5.4 million stitch marks will serve as the banner of the soon-to-be-historic rally at the Supreme Court to protect abortion access. Texan law HB2’s outrageous provisions have already forced more than half of Texas’ safe clinics to close its doors and women in the U.S.’ second most populated state are in danger of losing all but ten. Why is it dangerous? Because lack of access to abortion clinics do not stop abortions from happening. Women, instead, seek out extreme and often life-threatening alternatives. The Center for Reproductive Rights will be representing these women and the medical professionals who can provide professional care.

Artist Chi Nguyen took on the task of painting the picture–or tailoring the quilt–of exactly how many women this could effect with swatches of stitches tallying each woman of reproductive age in our Lone Star State. Accepting stitch-ins from all over the country and locally at New York City’s Textile Arts Center, Nguyen seized the age-old, community tradition and retooled the dutiful craft to send a message of unity, strength and resolve.

Art Report caught up with Chi Nguyen at the Textile Arts Center this past weekend to discuss her moments leading up to the rally and the quilt that could change 5.4 million lives and counting.

swatch Chi-Nguyen quilt 5.4 M and counting art report texas abortion laws

5.4 Million and Counting, Chi Nguyen. Photo: Tumblr

Chi-Nguyen quilt 5.4 M and counting art report texas abortion laws

5.4 Million and Counting, Chi Nguyen. Photo: Tumblr

submission Chi-Nguyen quilt 5.4 M and counting art report texas abortion laws

Stitch-in Submission, 5.4 Million and Counting, Chi Nguyen. Photo: Tumblr

 


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Christina Lee is a NYC gallery director turned art writer and editor extraordinaire. Enjoys long walks on the beach.

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